MHLS Home Future Trends

We are all architects of our future, we create the future - Gerald Celente, Trends Research Institute
The future of your library is more a choice than a destiny - John Guscott, editor of Library Futures Quarterly

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TRENDS SOURCE SUBMISSION
Attitudes/Perceptions    
As our society becomes more technologically advanced, the library is likely to become an important social outlet or community gathering place.   Josh Cohen
October 10, 2002
Increased recognition of the "creative class"
Attracting and retaining the creative class - which includes writers, artists, scientists and others paid to be creative - appears to be a key to economic vitality in communities. Professor and author Richard Florida outlines the value of this group in his book The Rise of the Creative Class: How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community, and Everyday Life. Community planners nationwide are expected to tune into this thinking.
Library Futures Quarterly
Fall 2002
Kirstin Litwin
October 14, 2002
Three issues are of increasing concern to Hudson Valley residents and leaders.
The economic vitality, the quality of public schools, and affordability of health care are considered important issues facing the region for Hudson Valley residents and community leaders.
Many Voices, One Valley Survey
A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
October 2002

Kirstin Litwin
November 6, 2002

Specific priorities exist among segments of the Hudson Valley population

  • Among residents with incomes of $30,000 or less annually, affordable healthcare and accessible insurance are top priorities.
  • Among households with children, the quality of public schools and availability of after-school activities are top priorities.
  • Among single-parents, the affordability of health care and quality of schools are top priorities.
  • Among African-American and Latino groups, the quality of public schools is the number one priority. The quality of jobs, and making healthcare more affordable rank second and third respectively.
  • Many Voices, One Valley Survey
    A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    October 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002

    Existence of quality jobs is of concern to many Hudson Valley residents
    57% of Hudson Valley residents feel the quality of jobs in their community isn't very good, while 51% of community leaders rate the quality of jobs positively. 50% of Hudson Valley residents feel their community spends too few resources on improving the quality of jobs in the area.

    Many Voices, One Valley Survey
    A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    October 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002

    Many Hudson Valley residents and community leaders see a need for after-school activities for children and teens and quality child care.
    48% of Hudson Valley residents and 49% of community leaders feel too few resources are spent on recreational activities for children and teens. Single parents specifically would like to see more money allocated to these kinds of activities.

    Many Voices, One Valley Survey
    A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    October 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002

    Health insurance is a real issue for many Hudson Valley residents
    24% of Hudson Valley residents either are currently without health insurance or have had at least one member of their household without health insurance during the past year. 41% of residents thirty years old or younger did not have continuous health coverage in the past year.

    Many Voices, One Valley Survey
    A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    October 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002
    Availability of affordable housing is a concern to many in the Hudson Valley
    60% of Hudson Valley residents and 69% of community leaders feel affordability of housing in their area is only fair or poor. 48% of Hudson Valley residents and 59% of community leaders believe too little money is spent on addressing this issue.
    Many Voices, One Valley Survey
    A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    October 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002
    Property tax cited as least favorite
    There's something Americans dislike more than federal income tax. Thirty-eight percent of adults identify the property tax as the worst tax according to a Gallup Poll. The poll reflects a sharp change since 1994, when the same question was asked. Larry Naake, executive director of the National Association of Counties, said local governments have increased property taxes as federal and state governments have required more without providing additional aid. Dale Eller, a resident of Erie, Pa., considers property tax the least fair because it hurts the elderly most and because local officials appear incapable of maintaining fair property assessments.
    Property tax cited as least favorite
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    April 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 23, 2003
    Arts/Cultural
       
    Major museum celebrates its opening
    The Dia Art Foundation's new museum in Beacon opened May 18, 2003. The museum displays work by contemporary artists such as Andy Warhol, Richard Serra, and Louise Bourgeois. Dia is housed in a former Nabisco box-printing factory on Beacon's waterfront and is the largest contemporary art museum in the world. The museum puts on display seldom-seen but world-renowned large-scale works of art.
    Beacon Welcomes Dia
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    May 18, 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    May 20, 2003

     

    Business/Economy    
    Over next 20 years - projected increase in individuals working and studying at home.   Merribeth Advocate
    October 10, 2002
    In a declining economy the public library is more heavily used than at other times. American Libraries
    October 2002
    Maurice Freedman
    Businesses exploring use for wearable computers
    Hilton Hotels is testing out a wearable computer for customer service representatives - it consists of a lightweight computer, printer, and flat touch screen. Several other businesses have expressed interest in such a computer.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    Likelihood of philanthropy boon
    The Global Business Network predicts a huge trend in giving over the next decade. Analysts predict most of the wealth will come from charitable gifts and other transfers of wealth between generations.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Rise of the "creative class"
    Attracting and retaining the creative class - which includes writers, artists, scientists and others paid to be creative - appears to be a key to economic vitality in communities. Professor and author Richard Florida outlines the value of this group in his book The Rise of the Creative Class: How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community, and Everyday Life. Areas that have large concentrations of these creative thinkers are likely to show significant increases in employment and population in years to come. Planners nationwide are expected to tune into this thinking.

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    Co-employment Program Saves Time, Money
  • Co-employment provides alternate path to having employees through "professional employer organizations", or PEO's.
  • PEO's take over the staffing function, letting the client company outsource its entire workforce on an ongoing basis.
  • Co-employment gives employees more benefit programs and increased professionalism in the handling of personnel issues.
  • Co-employment aids firms, workers
    Written by Craig Wolf for Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 8, 2003

    Businesses increasing use of temp agencies and outsourcing human resource tasks to "professional employee organizations." (PEO's)
    One significant reason for this trend is that it frees up managers to focus time and attention on knowledge based tasks as opposed to mundane activities.

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    IBM Corp. has reshaped the Hudson Valley, especially Dutchess County
    - Communities have diversified after 1990's layoffs. At one time, IBM was driving force behind the development of local communities. Many neighborhoods were primarily made up of of IBM employees. Since layoffs, communities have changed bringing variety in jobs and families. (Locally, about 12,000 people work for IBM in East Fishkill and Poughkeepsie - this is down from more than 31,000 in 1984)
    - Commuter patterns have changed. 20 years ago many workers in the southern part of the Town of Poughkeepsie and in East Fishkill headed to jobs at IBM plants - now thousands head to Westchester County and New York City.
    - Attitudes toward IBM have changed. Many feel IBM is not as loyal as it once was. Graduating students consider IBM as one option for employment, no longer the option, although it is one of the region's largest employers. Few look to IBM for a lifelong career.
    - IBM's workforce has changed. The company's average age is now between 38 and 42 with half its workforce having less than five years of service. Casual attire and increased flexibility are also noted. About one third of the workforce works remotely.
    - IBM still contributes to the local economy. Although not as predominant as it once was, officials in East Fishkill and Poughkeepsie claim IBM is still important to the local economy. IBM Poughkeepsie's tax payments are still the largest in town and IBM's East Fishkill plant has helped the town develop water systems and improve traffic flow in certain areas.

    The Valley Tomorrow - the Role of IBM
    Poughkeepsie Journal September 22, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 21, 2002

    The way women think and behave is impacting business, causing a marketing shift away from a hierarchical model toward a relational one
    Two factors contribute to this trend, the fact that women are involved in business in increasingly large numbers and the reality that women relate to others differently than men. Some notable statistics:

  • Women own 8 million businesses in the U.S., or 1/3 of all U.S. firms. This figure has risen 78% since ‘87.
  • Women produce $2.3 million in annual sales.
  • By the year 2005, 40% of all firms will be female-owned.
  • Women control 80% of all household spending.
  • Women purchase 75% of all over-the-counter drugs.
  • Women influence 90% of all car purchases.
  • Women own 53% of all stocks.
  • EVEOLUTION
    Trend Prediction by Faith Popcorn
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002

    Segment of underemployed persons in the region
    According to a statewide study conducted nearly a year ago, the Hudson Valley has 149,000 workers that "possess the skills and education to qualify for higher paying jobs" and would migrate to those jobs if they were available. The same study revealed that 37,500 people in the area would reenter the workforce if the proper job were available. Other data shows that large portions of the workforce commute considerable distances to work at jobs with higher pay.
    Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 7, 2002

    Regional economy is changing
    Three distinct economies are emerging in the Hudson Valley

  • high paying, information-based business sector
  • entrepreneurial economy
  • low-paying service and support industry
  • Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 7, 2002
    Regional agriculture struggling economically
    Farmers obtain very little profit from their products. They receive approximately $.25 out of every $1.00 spent by consumers. To address this, many farmers are diversifying their products in an attempt to increase income.
    Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 8, 2002
    Minority entrepreneurs on the rise
    The number of minority-owned small businesses have surged in recent years. This is most likely the result of targeted funding programs from government and private sectors and many successful minority entrepreneurs lending a helping hand to newcomers.
    American Demographics - reported in Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002


    Kirstin Litwin
    January 17, 2003
    International computer chip research & development center will transform upstate NY
    International SEMATECH, a consortium of 12 major computer-chip manufacturers in the world, will locate its next generation 300 millimeter computer chip research and development center at the Center of Excellence in Nanoelectronics at the University at Albany. The facility, scheduled to open in Fall 2002, will complement the first International SEMATECH facility located in Austin, Texas. Since its opening in 1988, the Texas facility has had positive impacts on the regional economy. The population has doubled, technology-related employment has grown, more than 200 semiconductor-related companies and 450 software development companies have located within the region. The capital region and upstate NY are expected to experience similar benefits. Governor Pataki said "this is one of the most exciting days in the history of upstate New York because it means the future, the 21st Century, is being developed in upstate New York.
    Press Release
    International Computer Chip Research, Development Center Will Transform Upstate Create Thousands of High-Tech Jobs in NY State
    July 18, 2002


    Kirstin Litwin
    January 29, 2003
    Money's Digital Future
    The future of money is increasingly digital, likely virtual, and possibly universal. Digital money has many benefits such as traceability, lower transaction costs, easier tax collection, and elimination of printing, handling, storing, and securing expenses needed with physical money. Digital currency would be especially beneficial to the knowledge economy/ information age since it makes intangible goods - ideas,creativity - as easy to buy and sell as tangibles. The biggest obstacle to such a system involves global integration of currency. Many nations fear giving up power and may not trust such a system. If this barrier could be removed, then the transaction of goods, ideas, and people could flow quite freely across national borders.
    Money's Digital Future: Economies Could Benefit From a Universal Digital Currency
    The Futurist
    January - February 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 31, 2003

    Growth of information industries creating a knowledge-dependent global society
    Information is becoming the primary commodity of more and more industries. The Internet has made it possible for small businesses throughout the world to compete with industry leaders, making innovation and information key products. New technologies have permeated almost every industry, making computer competence necessary for everyone. For a good career in almost any field, technology skills and continued training will become increasingly necessary.

    Trends Shaping the Future
    The Futurist
    January - February 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 31, 2003
    Construction industry helps boost job market
    With dozens of small subdivisions and other residential projects planned around the mid-Hudson Valley and local colleges looking to expand, the area's building industry is going strong. The housing developments and commercial construction work are creating more good-paying, quality jobs. Trickle-down from this growth and development is creating jobs not only for builders, but also for those in related fields. Joseph Kirchoff, President of Kirchoff Construction in Pleasant Valley, one of the largest construction companies in the area, says that while the commercial market may lighten up in the future, he expects residential construction to keep going strong.
    Construction Industry Helps Boost Job Market
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    March 2, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    March 3, 2003
    Fed launches program on financial literacy
    The federal reserve has begun a financial literacy campaign to help people manage their money. The campaign includes an educational website (www.federalreserveeducation.org) and a toll free telephone number (800) 411-5435. The program provides a wealth of consumer finance information aimed at helping people make the right decisions with their money.
    Fed Launches Program on Financial Literacy
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    June 2, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 11, 2003
    Entrepreneurial gap splits men and women
    A recent study by the Rochester Institute of Technology found that women start businesses to better balance their work and family lives, whereas men usually start them to build financial wealth. Many predict that female-owned firms are going to be a major force in the U.S. economy as female-owned firms are growing twice as fast as all businesses. Unlike men, female entrepreneurs tend to utilize a slow-growth strategy, hiring fewer workers and having smaller payrolls. Female-owned companies are more likely to offer family-friendly benefits, such as job sharing, parental leave, and telecommuting. Marketers are trying to better understand female entrepreneurs in an effort to better sell office equipment, loans, and other business related products.
    Entrepreneurial gap splits men, women
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    May 25, 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    June 20, 2003
    Consumerism    
    Increased marketing of drugs to consumers through TV ads
    "Researchers have found the greatest percentage increase in direct-to-consumer advertising in television ads, which increased more than sevenfold between 1996 and 2000. Proponents of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs argue that the practice leads to better-informed consumers and improved quality of care."
    Harvard University Gazette Library Visionary Group
    October 10, 2002
    Mid-Hudson Valley is a growing market for outdoor advertising because of the significant population growth.
    Highway displays and other forms of outside advertising are becoming recognized as effective tools for reaching potential customers in the region. Why? Because the Mid-Hudson Valley is now a commuting area with many new middle or upper class consumers traveling throughout the area. Likewise, many well-to-do New York City residents are purchasing second homes or renting weekend getaways where they can enjoy the beauty and recreational opportunities offered within the valley. Such displays are a practical way to reach this group of frequent travelers.
    Billboards and the Hudson Valley
    Hudson Valley Market

    http://www.highwaydisplays.com/
    hudsonvalley.html

    Kirstin Litwin
    October 30, 2002

    Dental spas pamper patients, calm fears
    Those who can't imagine an enjoyable visit to the dentist have never awaited a root canal with their hands dipped in paraffin wax. They've never enjoyed a pre-drill foot massage while taking in the scent of lavender candles and fresh cranberry-orange bread. They've just never experienced "spa dentistry" where neck rubs, juice bars, scented nitrous oxide are used to distract patients from the unpleasantness associated with a visit to the dentist. Timothy Dotson, owner of Perfect Teeth Dental Spa in Chicago says this approach is a way of erasing dentistry's "painful past." Picking up on the "spa dentistry" trend, the Chicago Dental Society will become the first major dental organization to offer a class on some of these techniques. Amenities such as hot towels, white-wine spritzers, free coffee, hand/foot massages, and fragrant heated towels are increasingly appearing as dentists try to meet changing consumer demands.

    Have a Cavity Filled and a Massage, too
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    March 2, 2003

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    March 3, 2003

    As demographics of gym goers shift, businesses are making a concerted effort to tailor their messages to specific groups
    Memberships at health clubs have increased 95% during the past 14 years, generating more than $12.2 billion annually. Once stereotyped for twenty-something bodybuilders, health clubs are now attracting a wider demographic spectrum. Recognizing this, health and fitness clubs are creating more targeted programs and specialized facilities for various demographic groups, and advertisers are partnering with these facilities in order to conduct target marketing of their products. Advertising in health clubs is taking a variety of forms from marketers hosting on-site promotions and demonstrations, to giving away free samples and apparel, to custom-published magazines or newsletters. According to Greg Helm, executive vice president of the Encino, California based gym promotions agency Health Club Panel Network, "The demographics of health club patrons are astronomical - the income, the buying power, the diversity. More advertisers are understanding how valuable these clubs are - probably because they're going themselves and witnessing what's taking place there."

    Locker Room Advertising
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    March 3, 2003

    Advertisers target "tweens" (kids 9-12)
    Once considered off-limits to advertisers, tweens (those beTWEEN early childhood and teenage years) are considered one of the most powerful consumer groups in the nation. They number about 30-million, nearly twice as many as a decade ago, and are extremely diverse, with one in every three tweens being non-white. It is estimated that tweens directly spend $10 billion annually, and influence and additional $74 billion of family spending. Recognizing that the stakes are high, companies are trying harder than ever to target tweens. Most feel if they are successful at reaching someone when they are young, they'll have a good chance at brand loyalty for life.

    Advertisers Target "Tweens": Kids 8-to-12 Spend Billions
    The Seattle Times
    October 21, 2002


    Kirstin Litwin
    July 1, 2003
    Baby business booms
    Demographers believe the U.S. is on the cusp of another baby boom. Many believe the number of births in the U.S. will be higher than those recorded at the peak of the Baby Boom. Possible reasons for a spike in births include the wave of Gen Y women (born between 1977 and 1994) who are entering their prime child-bearing years and the growing number of Hispanics, who, on average, have more children than white, black, and Asian families. Parents of the next boom of babies are expected to be a bit older and more established than those of past generations, due to the trend of later-in-life pregnancies. Sales of specialty toiletries for infants are expected to grow more than 20 percent annually through 2006.
    The Baby Business
    American Demographics
    May 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    July 1, 2003
    Say goodbye to bar codes
    Pinpoint-sized computer chips and tiny antennae that eventually could send retailers and manufacturers a wealth of information about their products, and those buying them, will start appearing in grocery stores and pharmacies this year. Within two decades, the minuscule transmitters are expected to replace familiar product bar codes, and retailers are already envisioning the conveniences the new technology, called "radio frequency identification," will bring. A grocery clerk might know immediately when milk on the shelf has expired and replace it immediately. Stores could easily pull damaged products that have been recalled. 100 retailers, including CVS, Procter & Gamble, and Gillette Co. have put forth a total of $15 million for research on the new tags at the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Saying Goodbye to Bar Codes; Tiny Chips to Beam Data
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    July 9, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 9, 2003
    Demographics    

    Increase in Babyboomer grandparents
    20 million boomers are grandparents today, 32 million projected for 2007. They are likely to spend a lot of time and money on their grandchildren's interests and education.

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Three demographic groups expected to significantly influence homeownership market across U.S. (between 2000 - 2010)

  • aging population
  • growth of childless households
  • growth of racial/ethnic households& immigrant households
  • Housing Development Seminar Series
    July 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 18, 2002
    Population of older Americans is increasing
    In 1999 one in eight Americans was at least 65; by 2030 one in every five people will be at least 65, as the baby boom generation ages. In general, older Americans are better educated, retiring earlier and living longer than ever before.

    Fact Sheet: The Growth of America's Older Population
    http://www.aoa.gov/May2002/Fact
    sheets/Growth.html

    U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services - Administration on Aging

    Kirstin Litwin
    October 21, 2002
    Aging baby boom generation will change life in America
    The graying of the baby boom generation will likely bring about significant changes, from expanding public transportation in suburban and rural counties, to diverting tax dollars from schools to the elderly who will outnumber families with children in the suburbs. A trend sociologists call "aging in place," which suggests most elderly adults stay in the city, or even the house, where they raised their families. However, these suburbs are often poor in resources for the elderly. By 2015 or 2020, it is probable that the non-working elderly will be in the majority. Local areas need to consider where the money will come from to pay for services that a growing senior population will demand.
    Aging in Place
    Terre Haute Tribune-Star
    January 2, 2000
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 20, 2003
    Hispanics now largest minority
    Hispanics have edged past blacks as the nation's largest minority group, according to Census Bureau figures. The Hispanic population in the U.S. is now about 37 million, while blacks total 36.2 million. Many feel the figures carry significant implications in terms of resource allocation, growing multiculturalism in American society, and political representation. The slim gap between the number of Hispanics and blacks is expected to widen over the next decade due to declining economic conditions across Latin America, and a higher birth rate among Latinos than blacks.
    Hispanics Now Largest Minority, Census Shows
    New York Times
    January 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 29, 2003

    Shifting birth trends
    There are three major ways in which births across the U.S. have changed:

  • Increasing number of births among older women - the number of births to women age 35 and older has jumped nearly 50% in the past decade.
  • Declining number of births among teenagers - according to the National Center for Health Statistics, the birth rate among women under 20 dropped nearly 20% in the past decade.
  • Increasing diversity among young children - while about two-thirds of women of childbearing age in this country are non-Hispanic whites, they account for less than half of the births in 2000. Based on this trend, in the near future more than half the children in U.S. public schools will be either Hispanic, African American, Asian or another race. This is already true in California, Florida, and Texas.
  • Top Trends for 2003
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 27, 2003
    Baby Boomers managing finances online
    Knowledge Networks surveyed 1,200 Baby Boomers, adults between the ages of 39 and 57, in the US in conjunction with American Demographics. The results determined that 13% of US adults between the ages of 39 and 57 with annual income higher than $75,000 refer to the Net every day for financial news.
    Baby Boomers Managing Finances Online
    eMarketer
    May 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 11, 2003
    Increase in elderly propelled by men
    Statistics from the 2000 census show that men are living longer than ever before. Nationally, there are 14.7 percent more men in the 65-and-older category. Longer life spans are the result of advances in technology and declines in the rates of certain chronic diseases. The increase in elderly men poses issues that the medical field has not previously had to consider. For example, as men age physicians are starting to see age-related issues similar to those in post-menopausal women: declining testosterone levels, glucose intolerance, age-related muscle loss, urinary incontinence. Many of these issues were not demonstrated because men weren't living long enough to manifest them. According to Catherine Hennessy, and epidemiologist in the health care and aging studies branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "older men do much less than older women to monitor their health and take care of themselves, this suggests men will need more medical attention."
    Increase in Elderly Propelled by Men
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    May 22, 2001
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 2, 2003
    Economic Development/Planning    

    Underutilization of potential development sites in the region
    Trend toward massive warehousing facilities, superstores, and large-scale malls are a big part of this problem since land parcels in urban areas are often not large enough to accommodate such massive structures. Lack of proper water and waste services at these sites are also contributing factors.

    Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 8, 2002
    Could housing market threaten economic health of the Hudson Valley?
    Some economic professionals worry that the housing market could erode the workforce and damage the economic health of the county. If potential employers can't locate housing at wages they can pay, they will not want to build a business in the area. Likewise, local businesses may find it difficult to find workers to to expand their current workforce.
    The Valley Tomorrow - Local Housing Market
    November 17, 2002
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002

    Regional program aims to sell valley to employers
    A serious regional economic development program, called Hudson River Valley Inward Investment Program, will begin Spring 2003. This endeavor will work to convince employers that the mid-Hudson valley has the labor force to support new industries. The initiative, which will be aided with $7.5 million over 5 years from CH Energy Group and managed by the Hudson Valley Economic Development Council, will take a regional approach to targeting investment. North American Realty Advisors of NYC has been hired to inventory real estate assets, develop marketing concepts and strategies, CRSR Designs in Kingston will do Web design and develop logos for the program, and Marist College Bureau of Economic Research will provide necessary data. The program will include areas in the mid-Hudson Valley served by Central Hudson, covering parts of several counties. Industries to be targeted by the Inward Investment Program include:

  • Semiconductor industry suppliers.
  • Telecommunications.
  • Information technology.
  • Computer services.
  • Biomedical, pharmaceutical.
  • Advanced manufacturing.
  • Financial, insurance institution operations.
  • Regional corporate headquarters.
  • Program Aims to Sell Valley to Employers
    February 14, 2003
    Poughkeepsie Journal

     

     

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    March 3, 2003
    New era on Hudson is coming
    Gov. George Pataki announced a Rivers and Estuaries Center to be located at Dennings Point in Beacon. The Center will be dedicated to the study of the Hudson and other rivers and estuaries, as well as the education of Hudson Valley residents and students from around the world. The shell of an old paper clip factory will be reclaimed for the project. The research center will showcase energy efficiency and clean-energy technologies and will include the main site in Beacon and two satellite sites, Columbia University's Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, Rockland County and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy. Construction on the Beacon site likely to begin in 2004 and ending in 2006. The Center is being praised as being a visionary development in the Hudson Valley's relationship with the river, as well as an economic and educational boon.
    New Era on Hudson is Coming
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    April 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    May 19, 2003
    Power line might follow rails
    Steve Mitnick, CEO of Conjunction LLC, has a vision and a proposal to run a 2,000 megawatt power transmission line straight down the Hudson River to New York City by using the railroad's right-of-way on the east bank. The project, called "Empire Connection", would run a direct-current line on the property of Metro-North Railroad, CSX Transportation and Amtrak, all of which would get payments. About half the150 miles would have above-ground conventional wires on poles and about half would have a pair of buried cables about five inches thick. The result of the project would be cheaper power sent to NYC. The project is still in the beginning stages, but many are optimistic and Mitnick has been traveling between New York and Albany promoting it to officials, investors, and environmental groups.
    Power Lines Might Follow Rails
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    March 11, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    May 20, 2003
    Education    
    More adults in college
    Adults are expected to make up 50% of total college enrollments by 2010, according to the National Association for College Admissions Counseling. Many recognize the importance of updating skills to improve job opportunities or change careers.
    Future Job Market
    CQ Researcher
    Jan. 11, 2002
    Volume 12, No.1
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002
    Professors Vie with Web for Class's Attention
    The growing use of laptops and the Internet in universities has some drawbacks, including students' distraction from their teachers. It was estimated that in a given class, 25% of the students might be playing solitaire instead of paying attention to the teacher.
    New York Times
    January 2, 2003

    Karen Weaver
    January 8, 2003

    Greater educational attainment - especially among women
    Overall, the number of high school students attending college is rising. Nearly two-thirds of those who complete high school now enroll in college within 12 months of graduation. Perhaps more significant is the rising number of women pursuing higher education. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 37.2 % of women between ages 18 and 24 were in college in 2002, versus 30.7 % of men. By 2012, the NCES projects there will be a million more women than men age 18 to 24 years old in college. The long-term impact of this trend will be to increase women's earning power, which is important as women live on average 8-10 years longer than men and can benefit from increased earning power to sustain themselves in later years.
    Top Trends for 2003
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 27, 2003
    Police security becoming part of life in schools
    It is no longer unusual to see uniformed police officers or security personnel walking through the hallways of public schools, as security has become an increasingly important issue. Since the 1999 shootings in Columbine, Colo., schools have considered safety a top priority. Many Hudson Valley schools are employing school resource officers, safety monitors, and other security personnel to aid in the protection of students and staff. Resource officers provide law enforcement, law-related education, and reality counseling. Officers mediate disagreements between students before they erupt into violence. Many officers are provided through county sheriff's departments, although some districts contract school resource officers through local or state police agencies.
    Districts work to beef up security
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    April 18, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 18, 2003
    Rivers and Estuaries Center excites teachers, school officials
    The Rivers and Estuaries Center on the Hudson has local educators excited about the teaching opportunities it could bring. Scheduled to open in 2006, the Center will be located on 64 acres along the Hudson River, and is expected to offer a conference center, classrooms and laboratories for research and educational programs. Center programs are expected to reach everyone from kindergarten students to post-doctorate fellows. Programs could offer students the chance to study the river on research vessels and field stations. Development of educational materials for children and teacher training programs are also planned. The general public could also benefit from river education lectures and a citizen scientist program, which would allow them to take part in collecting data for research.
    Institute Excites Teachers, School Officials
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    April 22, 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    May 19, 2003
    Dutchess Community College plans $29 million expansion
    Dutchess Community College is planning a $29.4 million construction program over the next five years. The program will bring renovations and additions to six major buildings on campus. The county Legislature still has to accept the plan. The upgrades may start as soon as next year, beginning with work on Bowne Hall and the Center for Business and Industry. The Center for Business and Industry will become the academic center on the north end of campus. College spokesman Ann Winfield says, "the upgrades will be important in meeting the college's space needs in the years to come."
    DCC Plans $29 Million Expansion
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    July 17, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 17, 2003
    Employment/Workforce    

    Existence of quality jobs is of concern to many Hudson Valley residents
    57% of Hudson Valley residents feel the quality of jobs in their community isn't very good, while 51% of community leaders rate the quality of jobs positively. 50% of Hudson Valley residents feel their community spends too few resources on improving the quality of jobs in the area.

    Many Voices, One Valley Survey
    A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    October 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002
    Segment of underemployed persons in the region
    According to a statewide study conducted nearly a year ago, the Hudson Valley has 149,000 workers that "possess the skills and education to qualify for higher paying jobs" and would migrate to those jobs if they were available. The same study revealed that 37,500 people in the area would reenter the workforce if the proper job were available. Other data shows that large portions of the workforce commute considerable distances to work at jobs with higher pay.
    Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 7, 2002

    Increasing cultural diversity will dramatically impact composition of labor force
    The following chart compiled by Mid-Hudson Pattern for Progress clearly identifies this trend.

    Ethnicity 1995
    % of total labor force
    2020 Projected
    % of total labor force
    Hispanic 9.2% 24.1%
    Asian 5.1% 14.5%
    Black 9.4% 13.0%
    White (non-Hispanic) 76.9% 49.4%
    Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 7, 2002

    Profile of the future job market

  • Global economy - market will draw from skilled employees globally.
  • Job/career flexibility - workers must be prepared for several job switches and career changes.
  • Flexibility of work venues - made possible as a result of technology, work doesn't necessarily have to become performed in a traditional office setting.
  • Adaptable workers - workplaces will change rapidly requiring individuals to be flexible.
  • Understanding of diversity - beyond age, race, and sex - workers will need to cooperate with individuals who have different values and perspectives.
  • Ability to work in teams - most work will be done collaboratively.
  • Shortage of workers - due to slowdown in the labor pool's growth rate. Labor force is only expected to grow 16% in the next 20 years, compared with a 50% increase during the last two decades.
  • Continual skill upgrades - ongoing changes in technology will require updates in training and education.
  • Competition for quality jobs - experts blame globalization and shrinking union membership for the declining number of quality jobs, or jobs with decent pay and benefits. By 2010, 18 out of the 30 occupations expected to increase most will offer poor pay and benefits, creating significant competition for better positions.
  • CQ Researcher
    Future Job Market
    Jan. 11, 2002 - Volume 12, No. 1
    Kirstin Litwin
    December 18, 2002

    Characteristics of 21st Century Employment

  • Seeking meaning from work
  • Equating "career success" with personal satisfaction over paycheck or status.
  • Everyone will need their own "name-brand."
  • Increased use of technology.
  • Finding work that needs doing.
  • Lifelong "trying on" of various roles, jobs, and industries.
  • Increased representation of women and minorities in the workforce.
  • Changing career fields numerous times in a lifetime.
  • Self-responsibility: everyone knowing they have to chart their own career direction.
  • What Will 21st Century Career Success Look Like?
    Written by Michelle L. Casto M.Ed. for Quintessential Careers

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    December 18, 2002

    Advantages of 21st Century Employment

  • More career opportunities.
  • Freedom to choose from a variety of jobs, tasks, and assignments.
  • More flexibility in how and where work is performed (working from home, telecommuting etc...)
  • More control over your time.
  • Greater opportunity to express yourself through work.
  • Ability to shape and reshape your life's work in accordance with your values and interests.
  • Increased opportunity to develop other skills by working in various industries and environments.
  • Self-empowerment mindset.
  • Opportunity to fill a need in the world that is not presently being met.
  • Opportunity to present yourself as an independent contractor/vendor with services to offer.
  • What Will 21st Century Career Success Look Like?
    Written by Michelle L. Casto M.Ed. for Quintessential Careers

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    December 18, 2002
    Co-employment Program Saves Time, Money
  • Co-employment provides alternate path to having employees through "professional employer organizations", or PEO's.
  • PEO's take over the staffing function, letting the client company outsource its entire workforce on an ongoing basis.
  • Co-employment gives employees more benefit programs and increased professionalism in the handling of personnel issues.
  • Co-employment aids firms, workers
    Written by Craig Wolf for Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 8, 2003
    Individual Learning Accounts (ILA's)
    Employees will become increasingly responsible for their own continual training and upgrading of skills in the future. The September 2000 edition of the New Millennial Issue predicts that society will establish a sort of social security system for lifelong learning called "Individual Learning Accounts" (ILA's). Employers will voluntarily contribute to an individual's learning account in order to recruit the best workers. ILA's will likely follow workers wherever they go and funds used to regularly upgrade skills.
    The New Millennial Issue
    September 2000

    Kirstin Litwin
    January 30, 2003

     

    Women catching up on career track, but men still earning more
    Women's continued climb into high-paying jobs in engineering, law, health, and management has helped narrow the gap between male and female incomes, but has not completely removed it. Factors such as putting careers on hold to have children, larger number of lower-paying jobs being held by women, and society's attitude that women's income is just a second salary, have likely kept women behind on the pay scale. Many predict that the income gap will continue to narrow as young women enter fields that were once "a man's work" and take further advantage of opportunities forged by women before them.
    Delaware Online
    Women are Catching Up on the Career Track, Men Still Earn More.
    December 30, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 26, 2003
    Many baby boomers delaying or supplementing retirement
    Many baby boomers have not saved enough for retirement and are likely to remain fully employed as they enter their 60's. In a 1999 survey by AARP, 80% of boomer respondents said they plan to continue working in some capacity after they retire. Given today's longer life expectancies and frequent medical breakthroughs, Baby Boomers may need to finance 20, 30, or even 40 years of retirement. For many, the only recourse will be work-either by delaying their retirement age or seeking part-time jobs to supplement their income. In addition, men and women age 55 - 64 years old have higher educational attainment and higher-paying professional careers than previous generations. For this reason, Baby boomers are less likely to leave their careers as early as prior generations did. Between 2000 and 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts a 33 % increase in the number of people ages 65 to 74 in the workforce .
    Top Trends for 2003
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 27, 2003
    Changing nature of work
    Census 2000 revealed that more than half of all workers are employed in management, professional, sales or other office-based positions. Workers are seeking educational opportunities even after becoming established in their careers. In addition, the rising number of white-collar workers,the increased use of independent contractors by corporations, and the ability for people to conduct business via the Internet have resulted in notable growth among self-employed persons.
    Top Trends for 2003
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 27, 2003
    Increase in senior women working past retirement age
    Current trends predict there will be a major shift in retirement trends, particularly among Babyboomer women. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the number of women 55 and older in the workforce will increase by 52% between 2000 and 2010. While part of this increase can be attributed to the growing number of older people as a whole, many other factors have contributed as well. Boomer women are better educated and more attached to the workforce than their predecessors, their jobs are physically easier and better paying than the factory or service jobs they held in the past, and new retirement/pension plan structures are pushing later retirements. It is likely the traditional marketing image of retired grandmothers watching television and playing bingo will soon become obsolete.
    Working Women
    American Demographics
    March 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    March 21, 2003
    Depression affects job productivity
    Over a lifetime, about 1 in 6 adults, more than 32 million Americans, will experience depression. Depression costs employers $44 billion a year in lost productive work time, according to a study reported in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Depression may be the most expensive illness for employers, as it is often associated with other ailments such as back pain, headaches and stomach problems which undermine a person's ability to work. Study researchers are working with major U.S. companies to determine how the cost of identifying and treating depression compares with what employers save in terms of lost productivity and health care costs.
    Numbers of Those Depressed Surprises
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    June 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 1, 2003
    Environment    
    Hudson dredging pushed back to 2006
    Dredging PCB pollution from the upper Hudson River won't start until the spring of 2006, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dredging will remove the lingering source of PCBs in the mud along a 40-mile stretch of river north of Albany. Estimates call for six years of dredging. The cleanup is the result of GE's discharge of more than 1 million pounds of PCB's (polychlorinated biphenyls) into the Hudson for about three decades until the 1970's. The chemical could cause cancer or other health problems, and polluted fish are an ongoing health hazard. GE is cooperating with the EPA in negotiating an estimated $500 million dollar cleanup. Since the project has been plagued by delays from the start, environmental groups in the Hudson Valley are becoming exasperated, calling the delays "unacceptable."
    Hudson Dredging Pushed Back to 2006
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    March 11, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 21, 2003
    Ethnicity    
    Increase in ethnic media
    Studies show ethnic populations pay more attention to ethnic-based media than general media, indicating that media firms must refine their marketing techniques.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    Increased immigration, especially from Latin America
    Census 2000 revealed that 40% of U.S. population growth was the result of immigration - and this trend is likely to continue. The majority of immigrants over the next decade are expected to come from Latin America, due mostly to its youthful population and proximity to the United States. Based on expected job growth rates, analysts project there will not be enough jobs in Latin America to support the number of young workers. As a result, it is likely that many will find work in the U.S., making managers who can speak Spanish and Portuguese very valuable.
    Top Trends for 2003
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 27, 2003
    Rising Hispanic Influence
    Now the largest minority in the U.S., with 35 million people, the Hispanic population is expected to increase 35 % in this decade. The median age of the Hispanic population is 25.8, nearly 13 years younger than non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. In addition, while Hispanics represented only 9% of U.S. households in 2000, they made up 20% of the 4 million children born in this country last year. Areas with growing numbers of Hispanics are likely to benefit from higher retail sales on items such as food, clothing, and other goods relating to children.
    Top Trends for 2003
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 27, 2003
    Web sites appeal to Hispanics
    While in-store retailers are actively appealing to Hispanic customers, online merchants are just beginning to recognize the opportunities presented by this fast-growing segment of the U.S. population. Office Depot and Sharper Image are among a handful of retailers that have launched sites entirely in Spanish. America Online recently launched its first comprehensive Spanish language national advertising campaign for TV, radio, and print. Target.com will be coming out with some merchandising initiatives online in English and Spanish, later this year. Many other large retailers are expected to follow suit as well.
    Web sites appeal to Hispanics
    Associated Press
    May 25, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 20, 2003
    Government/Politics    
    Now the largest minority, Hispanics are searching for a political voice
    While Hispanics have just recently become the nation's largest minority, they have already exhibited a transforming impact on American life. Salsa has outsold ketchup as the top U.S. condiment, ATM's now ask customers if they would like to withdraw cash in English or Spanish, bilingual education has swept the nation's classrooms, and artists such as Ricky Martin, Gloria Estefan, Enrique Iglesias and Jennifer Lopez have reached mainstream music stardom. Yet for all its cultural and economic impact, the Hispanic community is just beginning to find a political voice. This may be attributed to the 60% ineligibility to vote among Hispanics, since many Hispanics are not U.S. citizens, and their failure to organize politically as one group.They are very diverse group and discrimination among them is quite common. Activists say that Hispanics now have an opportunity to move their concerns to the top of the political agenda. Arturo Vargas, executive director of the National Association of Latino elected officials believes that "it is in America's self interest to make sure that Latinos succeed educationally, economically, socially, because a large section of the country is Latino, we cannot afford to have them underestimated, or undereducated. They are the future of this country."
    For Hispanics, cultural heft and new tensions;Now the largest minority, Latinos are still searching for a political voice
    Christian Science Monitor
    January 23, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 29, 2003
    Healthcare    
    Increased use of home healthcare
    Home healthcare in America is forecasted to grow by over 42% in the next five years. Evidence of this trend can be recognized in the telemonitoring services now being offered to patients with chronic conditions.
    Interim Healthcare
    www.interimhealthcare.com
    Matt Bollerman -
    October 10, 2002
    Smart Homecare
    "Health care is coming home again," according to William Herman, director of the physical sciences division of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Mr. Herman believes "it's driven by an aging baby boomer population, pressures to control health spending and the availability of new technology to implement decentralized care." Several companies are working at developing remote sensing technology for health-care and lifestyle monitoring. Some examples include: smart socks that monitor blood pressure and bandages that warn against the beginnings of an infection and perhaps even identify the responsible bacterium and appropriate antiobiotic needed to treat it. It is very likely that these kinds of "smart" devices will be part of every day life in the very near future.
    Smart Home Care
    Technology Review
    September 2001, Vol. 104 Issue 7
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 20, 2003
    Increased marketing of drugs to consumers through TV ads
    "Researchers have found the greatest percentage increase in direct-to-consumer advertising in television ads, which increased more than sevenfold between 1996 and 2000. Proponents of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs argue that the practice leads to better-informed consumers and improved quality of care."

    Harvard University Gazette Library Visionary Group
    October 10, 2002
    Retirements to worsen nurse shortage
  • A growing number of nurses will be retiring. The average age for a nurse in New York is 43. "We are in an acute shortage," said Catherine Kelly, chairwoman of the nursing and emergency program at Ulster County Community College. "The need for nurses is increasing exponentially because of the aging population."
  • There were more than 200,000 unfilled registered nurse positions nationwide in 2000, said the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In New York, the vacancy rate was about 11 percent in 2000, and in the Hudson Valley the vacancy rate was about 10 percent in 2001. "The indications are that it's just going to get worse," said Mark Genovese, spokesman for the New York State Nurses Association.
  • "Unless we turn the tide, in 20 years we're going to see a health care crisis where we won't have the workers needed to provide the care," said Monica Mahaffey, spokeswoman for the Healthcare Association of New York State.
  • Hospitals have been reaching out to high school and elementary students to encourage young people to choose nursing. The Nurse Reinvestment Act became law this year. It would create a five-year plan to provide scholarships and other incentives to entice people into choosing nursing as a career.
  • Toni Doherty, director of the nursing department at Dutchess Community College, said that the worst shortages are expected in 2015, when many nurses will be retiring. "As bad as it is now, it's going to get worse."
  • Retirements to worsen nurse shortage
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 31, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 8, 2003
    Flu surpasses AIDS as killer in U.S.
    The flu (influenza) has surpassed AIDS as a lethal killer and contributes to an average 36,000 annual U.S. deaths. This is largely because the vaccine is largely ineffective for the growing aging population. Drug breakthroughs in the mid-1990's reduced AIDS deaths from 51,000 in 1995 to 15,000 in 2001, but the flu vaccine has had disappointing results by comparison. Older folks are more prone to flu complications, but only 65% get vaccinated. Vaccination rates are also disappointing for people with high-risk conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.
    Flu Surpasses Aids as Killer in U.S.
    Associated Press
    January 8, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 22, 2003
    Drugs from Bugs
    Most research with insects involves getting rid of them or fighting diseases they spread. Now a group of researchers are studying insects, or the chemicals derived from them, to fight diseases. The researchers work for Entocosm Pty. Ltd. in Australia and are collaborating with other institutions to screen sample extracts from insects for potential pharmaceuticals. Insects have large arsenals of biologically active compounds, such as molecules that kill cancer cells, proteins that prevent blood from clotting, and proteins that glow in the dark. As drug-resistant pathogens continue to threaten human health, the demand for new agents to treat them will become more urgent. Entocosm scientists hope that insects will help win this battle.
    Drugs from Bugs: The Promise of Pharmaceutical Entomology
    The Futurist
    January - February 2003
    January 31, 2003
    Winning the war against aging
    There may soon be nothing preventing great-grandparents from being as agile in body and mind as their descendants. Drawing from the breakthroughs of the past 10 or 20 years, researchers are likely to develop methods to considerably delay human aging within the next few decades. William Haseltine, CEO of Human Genome Sciences Inc. in Rockville, Maryland believes that this generation is "the first to be able to map a possible route to individual immortality." University of Cambridge gerontologist Aubrey de Grey believes that human life expectancy at birth in 2100 will be 5,000 years, the result of antiaging discoveries, changes in technology, and people's lifestyle's as they strive to avoid risk and abstain from dangerous activities. A world without aging, however, brings forth valid concerns. Some include: overpopulation, ability to preserve not just the body but the mind of an aged person, continued existence of threats to the world such as Saddam Hussein who normally would die of aging, prisoners convicted of violent crimes being released with young bodies and continuing to pose a threat, or your children dating your grandparents' friends since it is difficult to judge age simply by physical appearance.
    Winning the War Against Aging
    The Futurist
    March - April 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 14, 2003
    Millions without healthcare coverage
    A nationwide effort, known as "Cover the Uninsured Week" took place March 10-16 2003, to focus attention on the lack of healthcare coverage for an estimated 41 million Americans in 2001. The effort seeks to bring people together to work toward providing healthcare for those without insurance. Local healthcare providers and business leaders joined Rep. Maurice Hinchey at a press conference on March 10, 2003 to discuss the issue. Many at the conference advocated a single-payer healthcare system where the federal government would make sure everyone has basic coverage, similar to the current Medicare system for the elderly. Kingston Hospital President and CEO Tony Marmo said those without insurance end up receiving care in the most expensive setting - hospital emergency rooms. He explained that the tens of millions of people without health insurance are not the indigent or homeless, they're working men and women who have lost their jobs or whose employers can't afford to offer them coverage.
    Plight of Millions Without Health Care Stressed
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    March 11, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    May 20, 2003
    Technology is shaping the future of healthcare
    An ambulance in Maryland relays real time information and images to a trauma center while in route, allowing a stroke patient to receive vital care during a critical time known as the "golden hour." Parents of a premature baby in Boston are able to monitor their child from their home and have the same equipment used by the hospital to provide educational and emotional support to the parents following the baby's discharge. In California, consumers are able to quickly access their private medical records via a secure website. These are just some of the latest developments in healthcare technology. Dr. Michael Ackerman, head of the National Library of Medicine's Office of High Performance Computing and Communications believes that "in this age of Internet and virtual reality, telemedicine and telecommunications have the potential to be part of nearly every aspect of healthcare, from consumer and provider education, to actual diagnosis and treatment of disease."
    Press Release: Technology is Shaping the Future of Health Care
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 6, 2003
    SUNY awarded patent for "Virtual Colonoscopy" software
    A new "virtual colonoscopy" system is giving patients a non-invasive cancer screening, as a result of a series of patents awarded to SUNY Stony Brook for new technologies they developed. The virtual colonoscopy will help physicians easily spot polyps and tumors via a virtual tour. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States and can be prevented with regular screenings. Many patients who should be screened don't do so because the procedure in uncomfortable. The virtual colonoscopy offers a much procedure and enables the physician to actually "fly through" the patient's colon, to find even tiny polyps.
    University News - SUNY Stony Brook
    http://commcgi.cc.stonybrook.edu/ artman/publish/printer_419.shtml


    Kirstin Litwin
    June 20, 2003
    Health mandate means more sales for tech firms
    A data protection mandate for the health industry is causing a mini-boom for the tech industry. Health insurance companies, doctors, and hospitals are spending millions on new PCs, networking gear and software to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, (HIPPA), which requires health-care companies to keep patient records secure. A doctor's office may spend $75,000 to upgrade systems for the act, while hospitals will need to spend millions.
    Health Mandate Means More Sales for Tech Firms
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    June 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 20, 2003
    Human Printing
    Need a liver transplant? You may one day be able to drop off some cells at the doctor's office and wait while a machine manufactures a fresh new organ. A promising new tool for repairing the human body is arising that will enable organ manufacturing or printing. Some uses for this technology include: organ regeneration and replacement, personalized medicine, and cosmetic and therapeutic enhancement.
    Beyond Cloning: Toward Human Printing
    The Futurist
    May - June 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    July 10, 2003
    Human Services    
    High rent forces many to shelters
    Officials in Dutchess County report an increasing number of people and families living on the street because they can't afford the rent in area apartments. Homeless are outnumbering beds in places like Hudson River Housing. Jacki Brownstein, Executive Director of the Mental Health Association said "homelessness is an increasing issue... the number of younger people, the number of families who are homeless, and the number of people in iffy situations where they could be homeless any day because of raised rents."
    The Valley Tomorrow - Local Housing Market
    November 17, 2002
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002

    A new form of retirement housing is emerging
    In large cities across the country, NORC's (Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities) are being organized. NORC's are a response to many seniors' resistance toward moving out of their own homes into traditional retirement communities. In housing developments where large groups of senior residents live, NORC programs coordinate local health and social service resources to assist the aging population, while allowing them to remain in their homes. In 1994 the NYS Legislature agreed to support 14 NORC programs, 12 in New York City. In May of this year, the federal government began the National NORC Demonstration Project in Baltimore, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has identified 5,000 apartment houses across the country that are really NORCs. For seniors involved in a NORC program, they can be happy in their homes knowing services are are always available to them.

    Trends in Retirement Housing
    Taconic Newspapers - 11/7/02

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 12, 2002
    A Third of State Nursing Homes Are Going Broke
  • More than a third of nursing homes are at risk of bankruptcy or insolvency and the state is being forced to step in.
  • The state has helped out nursing homes in the past, and is aware of the growing financial problems.
  • "The state's own data and our research shows that the financial trends are clearly negative and providers are at a crossroads. The days of widespread bankruptcies of not-for-profit nursing homes are not that far off." -Carl Young, president of the nursing home association.
    Lobbyists: Third of state nursing homes are going broke
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 28, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 8, 2003
    Day care demand high
    Child care providers offer care for some 6,500 children in Dutchess County, but at least 3,000 more child care slots are needed. Openings for infants and toddlers, as well as before and after-school care are in demand. Nontraditional care, such as nights and weekends or for parents who have flexible schedules, is in the greatest demand. Restrictions limit provider capacity and profits, making the child care field very difficult and leaving many parents desperate for day care.

    Day Care Demand High
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    March 17, 2003

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    May 20, 2003

    Bill may aid grandparents' custody rights
    Grandparents responsible for raising their children's children may have a better chance than an absent parent to gain legal custody under two bills announced recently. More than 143,000 grandparents in New York State were responsible for raising their grandchildren in 2000, according to Census figures. The bills require approval in the Assembly and Senate, and would protect children from being uprooted and removed from loving homes in those cases where a birth parent has not shown a willingness to care for a child.

    Bills Aid Grandparents' Custody Rights
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    June 17, 2003


    Kirstin Litwin
    June 30, 2003
    Land/Housing    

    Three demographic groups expected to significantly influence homeownership market across U.S. (between 2000 - 2010)

  • aging population
  • growth of childless households
  • growth of racial/ethnic households& immigrant households
  • Housing Development Seminar Series
    July 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 18, 2002
    Increasing concern about protecting open space in the Hudson Valley.
    The Hudson Valley has lost 70 percent of its farmland over the last 55 years. For this reason, groups such as Scenic Hudson are working to protect area landscapes by keeping land in private hands and shielding it from development. Such efforts are intended to decrease sprawl and to preserve agricultural landscapes.
    Closing the Barn Door on Sprawl by Saving Agricultural Landscapes
    Scenic Hudson

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 4, 2002
    Availability of affordable housing is a concern to many in the Hudson Valley
    60% of Hudson Valley residents and 69% of community leaders feel affordability of housing in their area is only fair or poor. 48% of Hudson Valley residents and 59% of community leaders believe too little money is spent on addressing this issue.
    Many Voices, One Valley Survey
    A project of the Dyson Foundation and the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion
    October 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 6, 2002
    Rise in home prices outstrips incomes
    While the cost a new home in the area is typically priced between $300,000 - $400,000, the home that an average Dutchess County resident can afford costs half that. Many Hudson Valley residents feel they can't afford to live in an area they have always known as home. They resent being "priced out" of their own communities. Affordable housing is increasingly becoming a concern, especially within southern areas of the valley.
    The Valley Tomorrow - Local Housing Market
    November 17, 2002
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002
    Commuters bring changes
    Commuters from downstate (NYC and Westchester) have greatly impacted the availability of affordable houses in the area. Many predict other impacts as well, such as rise in taxes to pay community firefighters, police, and ambulance personnel enough to live locally, increase in homelessness, and possible relocation of young and low-wage workers who can no longer afford the area.
    The Valley Tomorrow - Local Housing Market
    November 17, 2002
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002
    High rent forces many to shelters
    Officials in Dutchess County report an increasing number of people and families living on the street because they can't afford the rent in area apartments. Homeless are outnumbering beds in places like Hudson River Housing. Jacki Brownstein, Executive Director of the Mental Health Association said "homelessness is an increasing issue... the number of younger people, the number of families who are homeless, and the number of people in iffy situations where they could be homeless any day because of raised rents."
    The Valley Tomorrow - Local Housing Market
    November 17, 2002
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002
    Could housing market threaten economic health of the Hudson Valley?
    Some economic professionals worry that the housing market could erode the workforce and damage the economic health of the county. If potential employers can't locate housing at wages they can pay, they will not want to build a business in the area. Likewise, local businesses may find it difficult to find workers to to expand their current workforce.
    The Valley Tomorrow - Local Housing Market
    November 17, 2002
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002
    Regional agriculture struggling economically
    Farmers obtain very little profit from their products. They receive approximately $.25 out of every $1.00 spent by consumers. To address this, many farmers are diversifying their products in an attempt to increase income.
    Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 8, 2002

    Agriculture looking different in the Hudson Valley

  • Apple and dairy farms are giving way to smaller farms marketing specialty crops. There were 4,600 fewer acres of farmland in Dutchess County from 2000 to 2001 and 600 fewer in Ulster, according to the state Agricultural Statistics Service.
  • Horse farms on the rise in Dutchess County. From 1988 to 2000, horse farms increased from 6,500 to 7,000, and became more profitable, from $38.2 million to $126 million, according to the state Agricultural Statistics Service.
  • Experts agree greenhouses, specialty crops, agritourism, community-supported farms and organic farms are the wave of the future. (Note - agritourism refers to activities which "draw tourists for the experience as well as the food." This includes pick- your- own crops or corn mazes.
  • Apple, Dairy Acres Dwindling - Horse, Specialty Farms on the Rise
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 15, 2002

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    December 20, 2002

    Underutilization of potential development sites in the region
    Trend toward massive warehousing facilities, superstores, and large-scale malls are a big part of this problem since land parcels in urban areas are often not large enough to accommodate such massive structures. Lack of proper water and waste services at these sites are also contributing factors.

    Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 8, 2002

    Farmers Struggle to Maintain Crops

  • A local farmer recently filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy because springtime storms, early frost, and periods of drought wiped out his apple business and drastically cut into his pick-your-own vegetable farm.
  • The Hudson Valley Fruit Growers Task Force estimates local farmers lost 53 percent of their crop. The total loss this year for grapes and tree fruit, including apples, is estimated at $65 million.
  • From 1996 to 2001, Dutchess County acreage devoted to apple orchards declined to 44 percent. Les Hulcoop, agriculture program leader at Cornell Cooperation Extension, Dutchess County, says, "I'm hoping this is not a trend, but as you know, the orchard industry is under some pressure."

    Greig farm owner goes bankrupt
    Poughkeepsie Journal

    December 13, 2002

    Rebekkah Smith
    January 8, 2003
    Building Boom Heads North
    Several northern Dutchess communities have seen new residential construction nearly double in the last year. Red Hook issued 61 building permits for single-family houses in 2002, a 65% increase over the 37 issued in 2001. Similarly, Rhinebeck issued 96 building permits in 2002, twice as many as it issued in 2001 and four times the number issued in 2000. Towns such as Union Vale, which have experienced notable growth, have instituted new zoning to curb growth and avoid sprawl. Property is getting scarce as more families move north from New York City, Westchester, and even southern Dutchess to escape the hustle and bustle and to get more home for their money.
    Building Boom Heads North
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    February 14, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    February 28, 2003
    Libraries    
    As our society becomes more technologically advanced, the library is likely to become an important social outlet or community gathering place.   Josh Cohen
    October 10, 2002
    In a declining economy the public library is more heavily used than at other times. American Libraries
    October 2002
    Maurice Freedman
    Many library automation companies looking to XML (Extensible Markup Language) as key to seamless interfaces with databases, major web sites, homework help sites, distance learning services, book vendors, telephone systems. Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Audio E-Books becoming popular in libraries
    Libraries are beginning to circulate audio e-books and the MP3 players needed to listen to them. Most have found Audio E-books programs a success.

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    A new opportunity for libraries: Internet2?
    Internet2, a massive network of science and research information, developed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) has helped prompt the question - what is the next big idea for libraries and could this be it? People from NSF collaborated with ALA's Office for Information Technology to examine "the technical and organizational aspects of delivering advanced digital services through libraries and to suggest initial approaches to delivering these services." This development challenges libraries to consider some key questions:

  • How can libraries make a quantum leap forward based on this NSF venture?
  • Since the future of information seems to be digital and multimedia formats, how can libraries add value much like they did in the print world?
  • How can "advanced digital services" make libraries more important to their communities?
  • The Second Internet and the Next Big Idea
    By Joseph Janes
    American Libraries
    November 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 12, 2002

    Librarian Shortage Ahead?
    According to library journal, 40% of library directors plan to retire in nine years or less, and as of 1998, 57 % of professional librarians were 45 or older. In the next 12 years, nearly half of the country's 125,000 school librarians are expected to retire. Library schools and associations are working to address this issue by recruiting new people into the profession. Many insiders feel that removing the stigma of the library as women's work is key to attracting new library professionals, especially men. Presently about 80% of librarians are female, but some predict this will change as the job continues to become more technology focused. Low salaries despite the advanced education required may also be a contributing factor to this potential shortage.

    Library Journal Predicts Librarian Shortage
    Associated Press
    December 25, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 13, 2003

    Public libraries are allowing coffee
    Many public libraries are beginning to look like local bookstores with corner cafes and espresso machines. One library in Arlington, Va. has a sign at the entrance which reads "We're java-friendly!" Carla Hayden, incoming president of the American Library Association, says "more libraries are serving coffee in coffee bars, this is the bigger trend." This is quite a change from the traditional perception of the library, but in a time of stiff competition from bookstores, tight budgets, and a changing audience, many libraries are challenged to rethink how they do business.

    Check this out: Public libraries are allowing coffee
    USA Today
    January 10, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 14, 2003
    Growing importance of "article economy" in libraries
    The online delivery of articles, book chapters, conference proceedings and data is big business. A survey from Outsell/Infotrieve places the value of this "article economy" at $1.6 billion. Forbes reports that the #1 company in online revenue is the UK publishing company Reed Elsevier, which gets the bulk of its revenue from online delivery of articles and content. More publishing companies are offering their content online, and the growing sophistication of online searching skills among librarians and patrons suggests demand for in-home access to information will continue to expand.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Spring 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 3, 2003
    Self-service libraries
    In December 2002, the Sengkang Community Library, the first completely self-service public library, opened in Singapore. There are no librarians, no checkout desks. Patrons take care of their records through two membership kiosks, search the online catalog and check out the items at one of the seven self-checkout stations. Phones are provided for those who need to talk to a librarian for guidance, who can then use an electronic map to show the patron the location of an item.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Spring 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 3, 2003
    Lifestyles    
    Over next 20 years - projected increase in individuals working and studying at home.   Merribeth Advocate
    October 10, 2002

    IBM Corp. has reshaped the Hudson Valley, especially Dutchess County
    - Communities have diversified after 1990's layoffs. At one time, IBM was driving force behind the development of local communities. Many neighborhoods were primarily made up of of IBM employees. Since layoffs, communities have changed bringing variety in jobs and families. (Locally, about 12,000 people work for IBM in East Fishkill and Poughkeepsie - this is down from more than 31,000 in 1984)
    - Commuter patterns have changed. 20 years ago many workers in the southern part of the Town of Poughkeepsie and in East Fishkill headed to jobs at IBM plants - now thousands head to Westchester County and New York City.
    - Attitudes toward IBM have changed. Many feel IBM is not as loyal as it once was. Graduating students consider IBM as one option for employment, no longer the option, although it is one of the region's largest employers. Few look to IBM for a lifelong career.
    - IBM's workforce has changed. The company's average age is now between 38 and 42 with half its workforce having less than five years of service. Casual attire and increased flexibility are also noted. About one third of the workforce works remotely.
    - IBM still contributes to the local economy. Although not as predominant as it once was, officials in East Fishkill and Poughkeepsie claim IBM is still important to the local economy. IBM Poughkeepsie's tax payments are still the largest in town and IBM's East Fishkill plant has helped the town develop water systems and improve traffic flow in certain areas.

    The Valley Tomorrow - the Role of IBM
    Poughkeepsie Journal September 22, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 21, 2002

    Many take advantage of commuting hours to increase productivity in their lives
    As more Americans commute to their jobs, many are taking advantage of public transportation and ridesharing to free up valuable time. Some of the benefits of this mode of transportation include:

  • Time to read rather than drive. Dr.Wetmore of the Productivity Institute in CT estimates that an hour long commute over a year, when commute time is used for reading, can be equivalent to taking 10 college courses.
  • Opportunity to listen to audiotapes, do work, or create daily plans.
  • Socialization. Many commuters form close friendships with companion travelers.
  • Economical. Many feel commuting saves money in wear and tear on their vehicles.
  • Less stress. Free time before and after work helps many commuters to feel less frazzled and more focused.
  • The Commuter's Register
    Vol. 8 No. 1
    January 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 31, 2002
    Commuters bring changes
    Commuters from downstate (NYC and Westchester) have greatly impacted the availability of affordable houses in the area. Many predict other impacts as well, such as rise in taxes to pay community firefighters, police, and ambulance personnel enough to live locally, increase in homelessness, and possible relocation of young and low-wage workers who can no longer afford the area.
    The Valley Tomorrow - Local Housing Market
    November 17, 2002
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 18, 2002

    Easy access, home prices attract many

  • Many people are moving to Dutchess County for the housing prices that are lower than those in New York City, Westchester, and Putnam. Although farther north, Dutchess still allows a bearable commute to jobs in White Plains and Manhattan.
  • "That's a big issue, none of the kids who were born here can afford to live here," Town of East Fishkill Supervisor Peter Idema said.
  • Adjacent counties and New York City's five boroughs provided more than half of the newcomers to Dutchess in the past 20 years. Former Westchester residents account for about a fifth of all new households moving into Dutchess, according to the International Revenue Service.
  • The number of families moving into Dutchess increased by 45 percent between 1981 and 2001.
  • "People want a house in the country where they could do fun things, like shovel sidewalks and rake leaves and blast stereos," said Audrey Bongioanni, who left Manhattan with her husband about 18 months ago.
  • Newcomers redefining region
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 22, 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    January 8, 2003
    Most People Working Less; Some Can't Avoid Long Hours
  • There is conflicting data as to whether people are actually working more or less hours as compared to past years.
  • The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that during the last 60 years, the number of hours worked each week has actually dropped. In 1947, Americans were working 40.3 hours per week, but in 2002 they were only working 34.2 hours.
  • A survey released by At-A-Glance office products showed that office workers' days had increased to more than nine hours and eight minutes.
  • Growing trend of cell phones and computers may be making people feel that they are constantly on call.
  • Most people working less; some can't avoid long hours
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 12, 2002
    Rebekkah Smith
    January 8, 2003

    Organizations adapt to volunteers' fast-paced lives
    Today's fast-paced lifestyles have caused many nonprofit agencies to rethink the way they recruit. Many have had to increase advertising, develop websites, reduce time commitments and target different geographic locations to get volunteers. United Way of Dutchess County has reduced the size of its board and cut down meeting lengths as a result of time constraints. James Williams, President of Dutchess County United Way said "People have precious little time, they don't want to spend it listening to people talk, they want to be active participants."

    Organizations adapt to volunteers' fast-paced lives
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 22, 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    January 14, 2003

    Younger generation can expect less from their parents
    The number of people 60 and older worldwide will quadruple within the next 25 years. Babyboomers are increasingly not paying for children's weddings, down payments on homes, and other "starter funding." College payments and increased retirement expenses may simply be wiping them out financially. We are likely to see more books and media focused on self-reliance of youth and social changes related to this.

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 16, 2003
    More seniors in debt
    Seniors are filing for bankruptcy in record numbers, and many have turned to credit cards to pay medical expenses, provide money to children or grandchildren, or to maintain their lifestyles. 10 years ago only 18% of seniors carried credit card debt, today 46% do.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 17, 2003
    Families are changing
    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, families are getting smaller. Family sizes in Dutchess and Ulster Counties are smaller than New York and national averages. Factors such as people choosing to have fewer children, the overall aging of America, the jump in people living alone, and the growing number of women working outside the home have led to this decrease. Similarly, traditional families are becoming less prevalent, with blended families, single-parent households, grandparents raising children, and children cared for by aunts/uncles is becoming commonplace.
    Count finds fewer people in the families
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    May 22, 2001
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 30, 2003
    Tourism, vacationing, and travel will continue to grow in the next decade
    People today have more disposable income than they did in the past, especially in two-earner families, allowing them to allocate additional funds to travel and leisure. The number of American tourists increased 5% per year from 1981-1996. Once current fears of terrorism fade, this growth is expected to continue. Tourism is expected to benefit from the Internet, the result of "virtual" tours and current information on accommodations, climate, currency, language, immunization and passport requirements. As the U.S. and world population ages and continues to live longer, more retirees will travel, especially off-season.
    Trends Shaping the Future
    The Futurist
    January - February 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 31, 2003

    Women's equality movement beginning to lose significance, largely due to past successes
    Research shows that women have come a long way in bridging the gender gap. Some of the evidence:

  • Compared to older generations, Generations X'ers seem to be gender-blind in the workplace.
  • 57% of American college students are women. Among minorities, 60% of Hispanic and two-thirds of African-American college students are women.
  • Women's increasing entrepreneurialism has initiated "old girl" networks similar to men's relationships that once dominated business.
  • Women are exercising more political and decision-making power than in the past. One indication of the growing influence of women : life insurance companies are selling more polices to women than men.
  • The impact of women in the workforce may compel American companies to compete with their counterparts in Europe, whose taxes pay for national day-care programs and other services that the U.S. lacks.
  • Trends Shaping the Future
    The Futurist
    January - February 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 31, 2003
    Teleliving
    A conversational human-machine dialogue, called Teleliving, which would allow a more comfortable and convenient way to shop, work, educate, and conduct social relationships may be in the near future due to new trends in technology. Advances in broadband and computer hardware have tremendously improved speed and computational power of computers making a conversational interface more viable. The only advance still needed is in the area of artificial intelligence, which would allow computers to store information and distinguish which key words apply to certain data. Many people predict artificial intelligence will simulate the cognitive capacity of a human brain by 2020. Teleliving would likely involve a wall mounted computer which an individual could speak to in a conversational tone. The computer would respond to requests and act as a virtual assistant.
    Teleliving: when virtual meets reality
    The Futurist
    March - April 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 11, 2003
    Wireless communication impacting social behavior
    Researchers and ethnographers have concluded that wireless communication is having notable impacts upon social behavior - changes that will be long-lasting. They've determined that Americans are becoming more independent and spontaneous, more likely to plan at the last minute and arrive at meetings late, and more apt to share personal information in public. Research indicates that mobile phones support social networks as people are more accessible, connect more frequently, and are able to inform friends and family if they are running late or have experienced a change of plans. This ability to stay "in touch" seems to ease relationships among family, friends, and colleagues as people don't feel deliberately overlooked. In turn, being late is becoming more acceptable and the idea of time is softening as many people use their mobile phones to make last minute arrangements. Kids are the fastest-growing mobile demographic, with half of all teenagers between 12 and 17 carrying cell phones in 2002. The cell phone has almost become a rite of passage among teens - "you turn 16, you get a car and a cell phone," says Andrew Pimentel, marketing director for the New York based firm Upoc. Businesses see unique opportunities to reach millions of people individually through wireless marketing schemes - perhaps by special wireless promotions or sending coupons through cell phones.
    America Untethered
    American Demographics
    March 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 14, 2003
    Religious identity changing in America
    The majority of Americans identify with a particular religion, practice their faith to some degree, and hold strong spiritual beliefs. While the U.S. remains a predominantly Christian country, it is becoming more religiously diverse due to immigration and increased mobility across religious institutions. For example, the share of Hispanics who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith is rapidly declining with two-thirds of Hispanic adults considering themselves Catholic a decade ago, while only half do today. In 2001, more than 33 million adults reported that they had changed their religious identification or preference at some point in their lives, according to the 2001 American Religious Identification Survey.
    Religious Identity and Mobility
    American Demographics
    March 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 14, 2003
    Winning the war against aging
    There may soon be nothing preventing great-grandparents from being as agile in body and mind as their descendants. Drawing from the breakthroughs of the past 10 or 20 years, researchers are likely to develop methods to considerably delay human aging within the next few decades. William Haseltine, CEO of Human Genome Sciences Inc. in Rockville, Maryland believes that this generation is "the first to be able to map a possible route to individual immortality." University of Cambridge gerontologist Aubrey de Grey believes that human life expectancy at birth in 2100 will be 5,000 years, the result of antiaging discoveries, changes in technology, and people's lifestyle's as they strive to avoid risk and abstain from dangerous activities. A world without aging, however, brings forth valid concerns. Some include: overpopulation, ability to preserve not just the body but the mind of an aged person, continued existence of threats to the world such as Saddam Hussein who normally would die of aging, prisoners convicted of violent crimes being released with young bodies and continuing to pose a threat, or your children dating your grandparents' friends since it is difficult to judge age simply by physical appearance.
    Winning the War Against Aging
    The Futurist
    March - April 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 14, 2003
    Newcomers making more money
    Those moving into Dutchess County have more money than those leaving the county. Since 1992, adjusted gross income was higher for those moving into Dutchess than those moving out, according to an analysis of data from the Internal Revenue Service. The higher incomes are likely the result of newcomers coming from Westchester County or New York City, where jobs pay 25% to 60% higher than in Dutchess. Most newcomers in Dutchess are from New York City's five boroughs, Westchester, Putnam, and surrounding counties. Many commute to jobs in Westchester, Putnam, and Manhattan.
    Newcomers Making More Money
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    March 13, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    May 19, 2003
    Baby Boomers managing finances online
    Knowledge Networks surveyed 1,200 Baby Boomers, adults between the ages of 39 and 57, in the US in conjunction with American Demographics. The results determined that 13% of US adults between the ages of 39 and 57 with annual income higher than $75,000 refer to the Net every day for financial news.
    Baby Boomers Managing Finances Online
    eMarketer
    May 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 11, 2003

    The look of the future
    The faces of the future will look better and younger. People between 18 and 80 will probably look younger than their parents did at the same age. With the development of pharmaceuticals such as Retin-A and Botox, creases and wrinkles no longer require major surgery, encouraging more people make use of these age-defying treatments. Botox injections are now the No. 1 cosmetic surgery in the United States. Facial plastic surgeon Edwin Cortez predicts that in 50 years "there will be ways of rejuvenating skin, muscles and bone so surgery won't be required." Increased usage of vitamins and sunscreen are also likely to contribute to younger looking skin. An increase in mixed marriages and mixed children is also probable, as minority kids become the majority. The result will be darker hair and darker skin all around. White teeth will also be commonplace, as the demand for teeth whitening has increased more than 500% in the past five years. Thicker hair and less baldness will also be the look of the future, as technologies and pharmaceuticals in this area become more effective and widespread. Eye glasses will be less common, as large numbers of people undergo corrective eye surgery. Finally, based on increasing obesity rates across the U.S., the average American face will probably be plumper.

    Beauty Tomorrow
    Austin American Statesman
    June 23, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 25, 2003
    TV technology fits into people's lifestyles
    At one time, if you wanted to watch a TV program, you'd have to be in front of the TV when it aired. Then video cassette recorders became available on the market, and allowed people to record a show and watch it at a later time. Now, there are digital video recorders which allow viewers to "pause" live television. The show is recorded on the television receiver's hard drive and allows the viewer to rewind a live show as many times as necessary. "Manufacturers are designing products that fit consumers' lifestyles as opposed to forcing them to adapt their lives around the content or show" said Anne-Taylor Griffith, a spokeswoman for the Consumer Electronics Association in Virginia.
    TV Technology Means No More Dinners on the Couch
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    June 19, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 30, 2003
    Supreme court ends gay sex ban
    In a historic civil rights ruling on June 26th, the Supreme court struck down bans on gay sex acts, saying what gay men and women do in the privacy of their bedrooms is their business and not the government's. Many believe the decision will impact other socially divisive issues such as abortion and doctor-assisted suicide. Matt Coles, director of the Lesbian and Gary Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union said the ruling "should go a long way to make us feel more comfortable about the continuing vitality of a woman's right to choose." Emory University law professor David Garrow says the decisions "weakens the reasoning used by the Supreme Court's 1997 ruling that terminally ill people do not have a constitutional right to doctor-assisted suicide." Justice Antonin Scalia believes the ruling "could open the way to laws allowing gay marriage."

    Implications of Ruling Surpasses Gay Rights, Analysts Say
    June 27, 2003
    CNN.COM

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    July 2, 2003
    The second-home boom
    One of the hottest segments in real estate is second-home development. The growth rate of second-home buying is now about 5% per year, up from less than 2% per year in the 1990's. Most second-home buyers today are high-income, high-asset, middle-age or older couples. Many see a second home as a worthy investment in light of the poor performance of the stock market. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reveals that second-home owners are an average of 55 years old, more than half (51%) graduated from college, and have annual income averages of $83,600. Second-home owners spend far above average on hiring someone to care for their properties. On average they spend five times as much as those with one home on lawn care, home security, pest control, and housecleaning. Second-home owners spend three times as much as people with one home on transportation for trips, hotels, and other travel related expenses. In addition, people with more than one home contribute four times the average to churches, charities, and educational groups. Second-home owners are vitally important to the local economy of certain regions where they are prevalent, such as New England and Florida.
    The Second-Home Boom
    American Demographics
    June 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 2, 2003
    Builders catering to the over 55 market
    Home builders are recognizing the number of potential homeowners over the age of 55 is continuing to grow. Housing for this population, called the "universal" house, is designed for aging baby boomers not ready to give up their active lifestyles. "Universal" homes have subtle modifications such as: wheelchair-friendly door widths, light switches, and counter tops, lever (as opposed to knob) door handles and roll-out shelves, raised toilets, open floor plans, and direct 911 wiring. These homes address older adults' desire for independent, convenient living in communities that are attractive. AARP Executive Director Horace Deets, who spoke to the housing industry at a National Association of Home Builders Convention and International Builders Show, believes we are "in the midst of a demographic revolution that's changing what it means to grow older."
    Home Innovations: Builders Catering to Those Over 55 Huge Market: Aging Baby Boomers Bound to Make a Profitable Niche Even More So
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Feb. 10, 2001
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 2, 2003
    More Americans Living Alone
    The percentage of people who live alone is on the rise. More adults between 25 and 44 years of age are choosing to live independently. Between 1970 and 2002, the percentage of adults in the U.S. who lived alone increased from 8% to 14%, according to the Population Reference Bureau. 10% of 25 to 34-year-olds live alone, up from 4% three decades ago. The percentage of individuals living alone also increased among 35 to 44-year-olds, from 3% to 9%. These age groups span the years in which most people traditionally marry, yet fewer people are marrying now than ever before. Several factors contribute to this upswing in single living. Increased life expectancy with more folks spending their later years alone, and younger people delaying marriage and often choosing to remain single indefinitely. African Americans experienced the most dramatic decline in marriage, with the percentage of blacks who never married increasing from 32% to 43% between 1975 and 2002.
    More Americans Live Alone
    The Futurist
    July-August 2003
    July 10, 2003
    Media    
    Increase in ethnic media
    Studies show ethnic populations pay more attention to ethnic-based media than general media, indicating that media firms must refine their marketing techniques.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Most retailers are dumping the VHS video format
    (Libraries and video stores will still have them for some time, since 90% of US homes till have VHS VCR's)

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    New digital media standard expected in MPEG-4
    This media standard is expected to revolutionize the quality and storage capabilities of digital media. Many developers have already signed onto this format.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    People turning to new forms of media and less to traditional forms such as print
    According to a report entitled "U.K. Mediaphile 2010," which tracks media trends in the U.K a marked drop in print market share has occurred in recent years. Money is increasingly being spent on cable, satellite TV, the Internet, and other portable communication devices. Many analysts apply media trends in the U.K. to the U.S. since their markets are similar.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Will DVD's change media history?
    As DVD's become increasingly popular among movie-watchers, the opportunity for "photo shop filmography", or editing movies on PC's to create a new version, is becoming popular. Francis Ford Coppola says this "could lead to new forms of cinema." The link between creator and consumers is shortening and consumers are developing a keener sense of filmmaking. Experts predict that the biggest growth area for DVD's will be the behind-the-scenes features and extra skits rather than the motion picture.

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 16, 2003
    TV technology fits into people's lifestyles
    At one time, if you wanted to watch a TV program, you'd have to be in front of the TV when it aired. Then video cassette recorders became available on the market, and allowed people to record a show and watch it at a later time. Now, there are digital video recorders which allow viewers to "pause" live television. The show is recorded on the television receiver's hard drive and allows the viewer to rewind a live show as many times as necessary. "Manufacturers are designing products that fit consumers' lifestyles as opposed to forcing them to adapt their lives around the content or show" said Anne-Taylor Griffith, a spokeswoman for the Consumer Electronics Association in Virginia.
    TV Technology Means No More Dinners on the Couch
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    June 19, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 30, 2003
    Study reveals major networks lack Hispanic presence
    A study entitled "Prime Time in Black and White," conducted by the University of California, Los Angeles, found that while Hispanics are the nation's largest minority, they remain barely visible on the major broadcast networks. Hispanic characters received only 3 percent of screen time in fall 2002 programs on the six major networks. Whites received 81 percent of screen times and blacks 15 percent, both disproportionate to their population. Two new Hispanic-themed sitcoms, joining the successful "George Lopez" are scheduled for fall 2003. Alex Nogales, head of the National Hispanic Media Coalition in Los Angeles, said "Latino groups must get more from networks or look to advertisers to increase the pressure." Hispanic buying power is expected to increase to $926.1 billion in 2007, up from about $580 billion in 2002, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth.
    Study: Major TV Networks Lack Hispanic Presence
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    June 25, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 2, 2003
    Science/Technology    
    Many library automation companies looking to XML as key to seamless interfaces with databases, major web sites, homework help sites, distance learning services, book vendors, telephone systems Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    Computers will become more environmentally friendly
    Government and environmental groups have put increasing pressure on computer companies regarding "E-waste". Computer manufacturers will be expected to create PC's that reduce noise pollution and use fewer toxic materials. In addition, many companies are developing computer recycling programs.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Most retailers are dumping the VHS video format
    (Libraries and video stores will still have them for some time, since 90% of US homes still have VHS VCR's)

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    New digital media standard expected in MPEG-4
    This media standard is expected to revolutionize the quality and storage capabilities of digital media. Many developers have already signed onto this format.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    Affective computing may change human computer interaction
    This type of programming will give computers the ability to detect, determine, and understand human emotions. Work is currently underway to allow computers to read facial expressions and respond accordingly. Affective computing will likely be used for customer service machines such as ATM's, telephone menus, and information kiosks.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    Businesses exploring use for wearable computers
    Hilton Hotels is testing out a wearable computer for customer service representatives - it consists of a lightweight computer, printer, and flat touch screen. Several other businesses have expressed interest in such a computer.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Fall 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Increase in accessibility software to help elderly use computers
    IBM and SeniorNet have teamed up to develop a browser program intended for public computers that reformats the display and makes it easier for seniors to navigate.

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002

    Handheld computer and information device industry expected to expand

    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    Floppy and Zip disk drives will soon be obsolete
    CD's are now the preferred medium due to convenience of CD burners and reality that major software manufacturers sell their products on CD.
    Library Futures Quarterly
    Summer 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 14, 2002
    High Speed Public Internet Terminals may soon become as common in airports and shopping malls as pay telephones and vending machines. USA Today
    Kirstin Litwin
    December 3, 2002
    Most People Working Less; Some Can't Avoid Long Hours
  • There is conflicting data as to whether people are actually working more or less hours as compared to past years.
  • The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that during the last 60 years, the number of hours worked each week has actually dropped. In 1947, Americans were working 40.3 hours per week, but in 2002 they were only working 34.2 hours.
  • A survey released by At-A-Glance office products showed that office workers' days had increased to more than nine hours and eight minutes.
  • Growing trend of cell phones and computers may be making people feel that they are constantly on call.
  • Most people working less; some can't avoid long hours
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 12, 2002
    Rebekkah Smith
    January 8, 2003

    IMs: No longer just a teen thing

  • The range of places adopting instant messaging is growing rapidly. At LandsEnd.com, instant personal shoppers can help you evaluate purchases. You can also IM your broker at optionsXpress.com. IM is even used by air-traffic controllers, who exchange messages with pilots landing and taking off at Miami International Airport.
  • IMS: No longer just a teen thing
    USA Today
    January 3-5, 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    January 8, 2003
    techno animism
    Mark Pesce, author and virtual reality pioneer believes that children will soon grow up in a world where objects will have "intelligence" and "interactive capabilities", referred to as "techno animism." He says "objects will have a ongoing relationship with you because they remember, they have learned from prior experience, and they are always engaging you." Pesce believes children will "have a very dynamic relationship to the material world that to our eyes is going to look almost sacrilegious or profane." This level of animation raises issues with some people, such as Noreen Herzfeld, an associate professor in computer science at St. John's University in Maryland, who holds a doctorate in theology, fears that "animating those objects might turn people away from the natural world, and that the natural world would seem dull and inanimate by comparison."

    Technology's Promise and Peril
    Darwin Magazine
    December 2002
    www.darwinmag.com

     

     

     

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    January 16, 2003
    Gecko adhesive to create new markets
    Kellar Autumn, a biologist from Lewis & Clark College, has led a team of scientists to discover what makes a gecko's feet stick despite the pull of gravity. The team discovered that van der Waals force, a weak intermolecular bond that occurs between two materials that get very close, is the answer. Project findings have led Autumn to attempt a synthetic gecko-based adhesive. Possible applications for this type of adhesive include: micromanipulation where people need to handle tiny objects, such as silicon chips, moving them from one place to another without dirtying or damaging them, nanosurgery where a physician might need to pull on something very gently, such as a a nerve or blood vessel, toys and sports equipment, perhaps fumble-free gloves or special climbing equipment, and aerospace where astronauts may someday walk outside their spacecraft with gecko boots that would act like magnetic boots (except on nonferrous materials.)

    Science's Potential to Create New Markets
    American Demographics
    December 2002/January 2003

     

    Kirstin Litwin
    March 3, 2003

     

    Teleliving
    A conversational human-machine dialogue, called Teleliving, which would allow a more comfortable and convenient way to shop, work, educate, and conduct social relationships may be in the near future due to new trends in technology. Advances in broadband and computer hardware have tremendously improved speed and computational power of computers making a conversational interface more viable. The only advance still needed is in the area of artificial intelligence, which would allow computers to store information and distinguish which key words apply to certain data. Many people predict artificial intelligence will simulate the cognitive capacity of a human brain by 2020. Teleliving would likely involve a wall mounted computer which an individual could speak to in a conversational tone. The computer would respond to requests and act as a virtual assistant.
    Teleliving: when virtual meets reality
    The Futurist
    March - April 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    April 11, 2003
    Some Americans remain offline by choice
    While the cost of computer equipment and Internet access continues to prevent many people from going online, it is not the only reason why people remain offline. According to a study by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, almost one-quarter of Americans have no direct or indirect experience with the Internet. Among this group of non-users, the study found 20% of individuals live with someone who uses the Internet from home and 17% were once Internet users. Other reasons given for staying offline include the complexity of the Internet, lack of time, and concerns about pornography and credit-card theft.
    Some Americans Remain Offline By Choice
    The Chronicle of Philanthropy
    May 1, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    March 3, 2003
    New CD to prohibit illegal music copies
    Macrovision, a company which helps to keep videocassettes and DVDs from being copied, is joining with Microsoft's Windows Media software to allow record labels to make CDs that would allow consumers make copies for themselves, but prevent file sharing. Sales of CDs were down by 8.7% in 2002 and 2.5% in 2001, the only two declines noted since Sound Scan began tracking sales in 1991, forcing the record industry to consider the implication on technology and music distribution. Macrovision and Microsoft are trying to make their solution consumer-friendly by including a set of standard music files that can't be copied with each CD, plus a set of Microsoft Windows Media files that can be downloaded, drag-and-drop style, to the PC.It is likely copy-protected CDs will be on the market by Christmas 2003.
    New CD to Prohibit Illegal Music Copies
    Gannett News Service
    May 18, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    May 19, 2003
    Baby Boomers managing finances online
    Knowledge Networks surveyed 1,200 Baby Boomers, adults between the ages of 39 and 57, in the US in conjunction with American Demographics. The results determined that 13% of US adults between the ages of 39 and 57 with annual income higher than $75,000 refer to the Net every day for financial news.
    Baby Boomers Managing Finances Online
    eMarketer
    May 22, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    June 11, 2003
    Carriers push cell "texting"
    Cell phone text messaging has exploded in popularity in the last few years overseas. This short messaging service, or SMS, generated $15 billion in revenue in western Europe last year. U.S. cell phone carriers have also been working hard to get their customers to type text with their phone keypads. There efforts are beginning to pay off as U.S. phones sent 1 billion text messages in December, up sharply from 253 million a year earlier, according to the Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association. It has only been possible for about a year to send text messages between U.S. carriers. Previously, communication was largely restricted to other phones of the same carrier. U.S. media companies are aware of the possible revenue that can be generated from text messaging and are also eager to sell data services, such as news and sports scores, to wireless subscribers.
    Carriers Push Cell Texting
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    July 6, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 8, 2003
    Technology you can wear
    In the never ending quest for the human race to be able to do more in less time, technology companies have ordered the design of workable concepts for fusing technology with fashion from product visionaries. One concept includes the Mood Hood, an "intuitive" device inside a versatile hood that alerts the wearer of other people within his or her space and enables sharing of music clips or video files through a seamless connection. Another, the Hearing Hand, is a wired device worn on the hand that acts as an information source, retrieving data and sending it back to the wearer via a wireless ear bud. "An example of using this device would be with a billboard announcing a concert for your favorite band," says Stephen Nolan, area manager of Motorola's Personal Communication Sector. "You would point the Hearing Hand to the billboard, which would then read the installed bar code on the board and relay information "telling" you the concert venues, time, and dates." The Life Recorder is a digital memory database that can be strapped conveniently to the body. Working as a miniature camera, this gadget will record images, sounds, messages and notes from one's daily life into an electronic diary. The diary can be used as a reference to remind the wearer of people he or she may have met, or places visited in the past, by searching the stored entries in the database. Finally, Other's Eyes, another future concept product, may allow individuals to share in each other's experiences regardless of time or space. Other's Eyes is a wearable, miniature camera that records visuals and sounds in real time, relating it back to another person wherever they are.
    Technology You Can Wear
    http://iafrica.com/
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 9, 2003
    Say goodbye to bar codes
    Pinpoint-sized computer chips and tiny antennae that eventually could send retailers and manufacturers a wealth of information about their products, and those buying them, will start appearing in grocery stores and pharmacies this year. Within two decades, the minuscule transmitters are expected to replace familiar product bar codes, and retailers are already envisioning the conveniences the new technology, called "radio frequency identification," will bring. A grocery clerk might know immediately when milk on the shelf has expired and replace it immediately. Stores could easily pull damaged products that have been recalled. 100 retailers, including CVS, Procter & Gamble, and Gillette Co. have put forth a total of $15 million for research on the new tags at the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Saying Goodbye to Bar Codes; Tiny Chips to Beam Data
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    July 9, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 9, 2003
    Smart seats make air travel safer
    Long-distance air travel could become safer thanks to sensors in seats. Passengers on extended flights are at risk of deep vein thrombosis - blood clots that develop in the legs when people sit too long. The clots can break loose, lodge in the heart or lungs, and kill the passenger. Now, a smart airline chair developed in Britain can sense when someone's been sitting too long and issue a "get-up-and-move-around" warning.
    Airline Seats That Say "Get Up"
    The Futurist
    May - June 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 9, 2003
    Human Printing
    Need a liver transplant? You may one day be able to drop off some cells at the doctor's office and wait while a machine manufactures a fresh new organ. A promising new tool for repairing the human body is arising that will enable organ manufacturing or printing. Some uses for this technology include: organ regeneration and replacement, personalized medicine, and cosmetic and therapeutic enhancement.
    Beyond Cloning: Toward Human Printing
    The Futurist
    May - June 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    July 10, 2003
    Promise of hydrogen energy
    More than a hundred companies are racing to commercialize hydrogen fuel cells for a a range of applications, from generating electric power to running small devices like cell phones. In the automobile industry, the race to the marketplace is especially heated. Recent progress in fuel cells - the key to hydrogen technology - is the main development attracting attention to hydrogen today. Fuel cells convert hydrogen to electricity without combustion, using an electrochemical process that is highly efficient and totally nonpolluting. By the end of this decade, fuel cells are expected to cost about $400 per kilowatt, which would make them competitive with every type of power.
    The Excitement About Hydrogen
    The Futurist
    July - August 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 10, 2003
    Transportation    

    Growth across the region has had significant impacts on transportation
    - The number of cars on local roads has dramatically increased causing more congestion and accidents. On certain roads the amount of cars has more than tripled over the last couple decades.The problem is particularly evident in Southern Dutchess county, which has experienced rapid population growth.
    - Longer commutes and more commuters have contributed to traffic problems. Census 2000 for Dutchess County revealed an average daily one-way commute increase by 5 minutes (from 25 min. to 30 min.) and more residents commuting to jobs outside the county. People are also leaving home earlier to get to their jobs.
    - Taconic Parkway greatly impacted by increased traffic. Taconic was originally built as a rural getaway for New York City residents. In recent years it has become a busy commuter highway bringing thousands in the opposite direction - southbound to Westchester and New York City. Due to accidents and safety concerns the Dept. of Transportation (DOT) has closed intersections and blocked off medians at at-grade crossings. This, in turn, has forced traffic onto local roads. DOT plans to build overpasses at some of the closed crossings, which is likely to ease traffic on several local roads, but this will probably not take place for several years.
    - New road plans are critical to addressing transportation problems. Local experts believe getting people and businesses to move near existing roads, highways, and rail lines instead of building new roads will need to be a goal in the next 50 years. Concentrating development in existing areas would make mass transit more feasible and would maximize funding.
    - Commuter options likely to become a priority. Trains, buses and carpools are options transportation experts expect to become more popular in the future. MetroNorth expects riders to increase by 43% on the upper Hudson line and 84% on the upper Harlem line between 2000 and 2010. Organizations such as Metro pool Inc. (www.Metropool.com) and the Regional Plan Association (www.rpa.org) feel employers can play a big part in reducing congestion on roads by offering workers alternatives. Some possibilities include: carpooling, allowing employees to work flexible schedules, telecommuting, offering guaranteed emergency rides home for car-poolers, or subsidizing the cost of mass transit for employees.

    The Valley Tomorrow - Roads & Transportation
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    October 20, 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 22, 2002
    Ridership Reflects Population Growth
  • The Hudson and Harlem lines which serve Dutchess County continue to see increases in off-peak use and at the Poughkeepsie station.
  • Despite the recession and the after-effects of the terrorist attacks that changed the work destinations of many commuters, Metro-North expects 71.7 million rides in 2002, an all time high. Rides are expected to increase to 72.4 million in 2003.
  • The numbers for the Upper Hudson line show a 6.8% increase in November compared with the same month in 2001, and a 2.6% increase for the year through December 11. Off-peak rides have jumped to 11%, possibly because more people are taking day trips to the city or traveling less for vacations.
  • At the Poughkeepsie station, spokeswoman Marjorie Anders said that there was a 12% increase in rides in November with the same month last year and overall a 9% increased when compared to 2001.
  • "We definitely can predict it [ridership] will continue to grow," Anders said.
  • Ridership Reflects population growth
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    December 30, 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    January 8, 2003

    Census 2000 shows changes in commuter patterns
    Census 2000 revealed several trends regarding commuter patterns across America. Some of them include:

  • More commuters are driving to work alone
  • Commute time to work has increased
  • Increase of people moving from city centers to suburbs has contributed to increased commutes.
  • More lateral commuting as opposed to the traditional radial commute is occurring.
    *Note - A demographer for the U.S. Census claims "single-occupant vehicles are the overwhelming trend in American transportation."
  • The Commuter's Register
    Issue 0209
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 30, 2002

    Many take advantage of commuting hours to increase productivity in their lives
    As more Americans commute to their jobs, many are taking advantage of public transportation and ridesharing to free up valuable time. Some of the benefits of this mode of transportation include:

  • Time to read rather than drive. Dr.Wetmore of the Productivity Institute in CT estimates that an hour long commute over a year, when commute time is used for reading, can be equivalent to taking 10 college courses.
  • Opportunity to listen to audiotapes, do work, or create daily plans.
  • Socialization. Many commuters form close friendships with companion travelers.
  • Economical. Many feel commuting saves money in wear and tear on their vehicles.
  • Less stress. Free time before and after work helps many commuters to feel less frazzled and more focused.
  • The Commuter's Register
    Vol. 8 No. 1
    January 2002
    Kirstin Litwin
    October 31, 2002

    Building a Greater Hudson Valley Transportation System
    While the region has many transportation assets, improvements are needed to manage growth. Some key elements include:

  • constructing new north-south truck routes.
  • creating direct access to Stewart International Airport with interchanges on Route I-84 and I-87.
  • use of ferry service for commuters and tourists.
  • linking existing rail commuter and freight lines with Stewart.
  • Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Report
    2002 - 2003
    Prepared by the Hudson Valley Regional Council and Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation
    Kirstin Litwin
    November 8, 2002
    Ferries will ply the Hudson River Again
    Hundreds of ferries once traveled the Hudson River, but were displaced by cars and trains. Many officials are now seeing a place for them once again, as they offer an opportunity to use the Hudson River for economic development, recreation, tourism and commuting. This summer, ferry service is likely to become available between Newburgh and Beacon. In two or three years, a ferry line may link Tivoli, Rhinebeck, Saugerties, and Kingston.
    Ferries will ply the Hudson River again
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    November 12, 2002

    Kirstin Litwin
    November 15, 2002
    Wider roads, new bridge needed in Hudson Valley
    Mid-Hudson Pattern for Progress, a Newburgh-based think tank, recently released a 10-point plan to address future transportation needs of the Hudson Valley. The study predicts the region's population will increase from 2.2 million to nearly 2.6 million by 2050 and the area's transportation system must respond. Highlights of the report include recommendations for two-lane interstate highways to be increased to three lanes and another bridge across the Hudson River, most likely at Rt. 299 in Lloyd.
    Study: Widen roads, build bridge
    Poughkeespie Journal
    January 17, 2003

    Kirstin Litwin
    January 24, 2003
    Metro-North chief discusses growth plans
    Metro-North Railroad President Peter Cannito emphasized plans to cope with a growing ridership on the Hudson and Harlem lines during a speech at the Poughkeepsie Area Chamber of Commerce breakfast on July 16, 2003. He said more than 5,000 people from Dutchess County commute by train every weekday and that number is growing. He stated the reason for ridership growth is the reliability of the trains. Cannito mentioned that more than $1.3 billion has been set aside by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the New York Legislature to maintain and improve Metro-North. Currently, nine new locomotives are being used on the Hudson and Harlem lines, and an anticipated 24 coaches are to be added next year.
    Metro-North Chief Discusses Growth Plans
    Poughkeepsie Journal
    July 17, 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    July 17, 2003
    Tourism    
    Tourism, vacationing, and travel will continue to grow in the next decade
    People today have more disposable income than they did in the past, especially in two-earner families, allowing them to allocate additional funds to travel and leisure. The number of American tourists increased 5% per year from 1981-1996. Once current fears of terrorism fade, this growth is expected to continue. Tourism is expected to benefit from the Internet, the result of "virtual" tours and current information on accommodations, climate, currency, language, immunization and passport requirements. As the U.S. and world population ages and continues to live longer, more retirees will travel, especially off-season.
    Trends Shaping the Future
    The Futurist
    January - February 2003
    Kirstin Litwin
    January 31, 2003

     

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